astro-news from Institute of Astronomy Library in Inoreader
VIDEO: Footage of powerful solar flares
The US Space Agency Nasa has released new footage showing a series of powerful solar flares.
Voyager 2's view of solar system's edge will be unique
There's reason to think Voyager 2's sensors will pick up changes that contrast with what Voyager 1 saw en route to the edge of interstellar space






Our monthly digest features astronomy and space science events coming up during...
Our monthly digest features astronomy and space science events coming up during September

https://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/2501-space-and-astronomy-digest-september-2014


Space and astronomy digest: September 2014
www.ras.org.uk
The latest digest of upcoming news and astronomy events, from the RAS. This month sees two spacecraft arrive at Mars, the launch of the latest mission to the International Space Station and the first Paul Ruffle memorial lecture.
Voyager 2's view of solar system's edge will be unique
There's reason to think Voyager 2's sensors will pick up changes that contrast with what Voyager 1 saw en route to the edge of interstellar space






Experiment tests whether universe is a hologram
A new device searching for fundamental units of space and time has officially started taking data, and could reveal new features of the nature of reality






Vibrations in rings reveal Saturn's inner secrets
Eavesdropping on Saturn's rings has given us clues about surprises in the gas giant's interior






Source of sun's power revealed by ghostly particles
The first detection of neutrinos produced by fusion in the sun confirms that our star has been stable for millions of years






Supernova find backs dark energy and universe expansion
The first evidence that type Ia supernovae are thermonuclear explosions solidifies one of the cornerstones to the discovery of dark energy






NASA's Spitzer Telescope Witnesses Asteroid Smashup
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the formation of planets.
Dead stars 'can re-ignite' and blow
Astronomers have shown that dead stars known as white dwarfs can re-ignite and explode as supernovas.
A mixed-up magnetic storm
The Sun is a variable star, experiencing 11-year-long cycles of activity which impact our planet and near-Earth space. Forecasting the changing space weather and the effects it will have on Earth remains a challenge, as illustrated by an unusual magnetic storm that was observed by ESA’s Cluster quartet and one of the Chinese-ESA Double Star spacecraft.
NASA Telescopes Help Uncover Early Construction Phase Of Giant Galaxy

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The birth of massive galaxies, according to galaxy formation theories, begins with the buildup of a dense, compact core that is ablaze with the glow of millions of newly formed stars. Evidence of this early construction phase, however, has eluded astronomers until now. Astronomers identified a dense galactic core, dubbed "Sparky," using a combination of data from Hubble and Spitzer, other space telescopes, and the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. Hubble photographed the emerging galaxy as it looked 11 billion years ago, just 3 billion years after the birth of our universe in the big bang.

Witnessing the early growth of a giant - First ever sighting of galaxy core formation [heic1418]
Astronomers have uncovered for the first time the earliest stages of a massive galaxy forming in the young Universe. The discovery was made possible through combining observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA's Herschel Space Observatory, and the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The growing galaxy core is blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate. The paper appears in the journal Nature on 27 August.
INTEGRAL catches dead star exploding in a blaze of glory
Astronomers using ESA's INTEGRAL gamma-ray observatory have demonstrated beyond doubt that dead stars known as white dwarfs can reignite and explode as supernovae.
Vibrations in rings reveal Saturn's inner secrets
Eavesdropping on Saturn's rings has given us clues about surprises in the gas giant's interior






NASA Telescopes Uncover Early Construction of Giant Galaxy
Astronomers have for the first time caught a glimpse of the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction. The building site, dubbed “Sparky,” is a dense galactic core blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.
Astronomy: Collision history written in rock

Astronomy: Collision history written in rock

Nature 512, 7515 (2014). doi:10.1038/512350c

Meteorites recovered in California have yielded details about their collision-filled journey from the Solar System's asteroid belt.The fragments (pictured) originated from a meteoroid whose fiery descent lit up the night sky over San Francisco in 2012. Peter Jenniskens of NASA's Ames Research

Astrobiology: Cosmic prestige

Astrobiology: Cosmic prestige

Nature 512, 7515 (2014). doi:10.1038/512368a

Author: Mario Livio

Mario Livio welcomes a lucid description of attempts to evaluate how special humans are.

Astrophysics: Supernova seen through γ-ray eyes

Astrophysics: Supernova seen through γ-ray eyes

Nature 512, 7515 (2014). doi:10.1038/512375a

Authors: Robert P. Kirshner

Observations of γ-ray photons from a type Ia supernova indicate that stellar explosions of this kind get their energy from sudden thermonuclear fusion in the progenitor star. See Letter p.406

Neutrinos from the primary proton–proton fusion process in the Sun

Neutrinos from the primary proton–proton fusion process in the Sun

Nature 512, 7515 (2014). doi:10.1038/nature13702

Authors:

In the core of the Sun, energy is released through sequences of nuclear reactions that convert hydrogen into helium. The primary reaction is thought to be the fusion of two protons with the emission of a low-energy neutrino. These so-called pp neutrinos constitute nearly