Highly Allochthonous

NEWS & COMMENTARY FROM THE WORLD OF GEOLOGY & EARTH SCIENCE

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Spooky seismic action at a distance: moderate earthquakes in western US cause submarine landslides in the Gulf of Mexico

This is such a cool study, and such an interesting result! Check out @IRIS_EPO's latest science highlight! Scientists discovered numerous previously unknown submarine landslides in the Gulf of Mexico that were triggered by earthquakes that were *super* far away! https://t.co/u62I5HFLVM— Alka Tripathy-Lang, Ph.D. (@DrAlkaTrip) May 26, 2020...

Two reflections on the largest earthquake yet recorded, 60 years later.

It has been 60 years since a magnitude 9.5 earthquake struck the Chilean coast near Valdivia. The stats for this earthquake remain pretty mind-blowing even today. It is still the largest earthquake ever recorded – over 20% of the Earth’s seismic energy output over the last 120 years was released by this one earthquake. The rupture was around 1000 km...

Watershed Hydrology – Complete Compendium of my Online Teaching Resources

In Spring 2020, my Watershed Hydrology class transitioned to online in mid-March. This spurred me to create more blog posts and YouTube videos to provide content for the remaining units of the course. This substantial effort added to work I had been doing over the past several years to provide online resources to students in the class. Before we moved...

How I taught Flooding online in Spring 2020

This post is part of a series in which I provide the details of each unit I taught post-transitioning to online in Spring 2020 in the Watershed Hydrology class at Kent State University. For more context about the course and my perspective on it, please read the introductory post. [I’ve added some bracketed notes about things I’d change up for a future...

How I taught Streamflow online in Spring 2020

This post is part of a series in which I provide the details of each unit I taught post-transitioning to online in Spring 2020 in the Watershed Hydrology class at Kent State University. For more context about the course and my perspective on it, please read the introductory post. [I’ve added some bracketed notes about things I’d change up for a future...

How I taught Streamflow Generation online in Spring 2020

This post is part of a series in which I provide the details of each unit I taught post-transitioning to online in Spring 2020 in the Watershed Hydrology class at Kent State University. For more context about the course and my perspective on it, please read the introductory post. [I’ve added some bracketed notes about things I’d change up for a future...

How I taught Soil Moisture and Infiltration online in spring 2020

This post is part of a series of posts in which I provide the details of each unit I taught post-transitioning to online in Spring 2020 in the Watershed Hydrology class at Kent State University. For more context about the course and my perspective on it, please read the introductory post. [I’ve added some bracketed notes about things I’d change up for...

Moving Watershed Hydrology online in 3 days: how I did it, how it went, and how I’m working to make it better next time

When Kent State “pivoted to online” in mid-March, I was about half-way through my Watershed Hydrology class. For context, this class typically has about 20-25 undergraduate students, from geology, environmental studies, and conservation biology majors, and about 5-8 graduate students from geology and geography. I use the first part of the Brooks et...

A Riverine Flooding Cookbook, Volume 1: Meteorological Floods

Legendary fluvial geomorphologist Reds Wolman once said “Floods come from too much water,” and that’s the phenomenon distilled to its core essence. But this bit of wisdom doesn’t give us much to go on if we want to understand what creates floods or why some areas are more flood-prone than others. It’s the cooking equivalent to “Bread comes from flour.”...

Remagnetisation spoils the paleomagnetic party again

Did the Earth have a magnetic field before 3.5 billion years ago? Previous paleomagnetic studies of the world’s oldest mineral grains – the Jack Hills zircons, which have maximum ages of 4.4 billion years, claimed that tiny inclusions of magnetite within those grains had taken a snapshot of a strong geomagnetic field at the time they formed.  ...

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