GeoSpace

By AGU staff and collaborators

Latest articles

How to design continents for maximum tides

A new study simulates ocean tides on imaginary Earth-like worlds, revealing the limits of topography’s influence on tidal energy By Liza Lester The shape and size of continents control the size of ocean tides on Earth-like planets, according to a new study that simulated the effects of random continental configurations on the energy of tides. The...

Vulnerable carbon stores twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in, new research finds

By Kate Peterson New research suggests that subsidence, gradually sinking terrain caused by the loss of ice and soil mass in permafrost, is causing deeper thaw than previously thought and making vulnerable twice as much carbon as estimates that don’t account for this shifting ground. These findings, published this week in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical...

Utah’s arches continue to whisper their secrets

By Paul Gabrielsen, University of Utah Two new studies show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches—like the iconic Delicate Arch—into shapes that lend added strength. A study published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters begins with thorough measurements of vibrations...

Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream

Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to miners but also to nearby communities. Contrary to common assumption that communities closest to mining bear the brunt of exposure, new evidence shows that the highest non-occupational mercury exposures occur in native communities hundreds of kilometers away from mining....

Hydrologists show environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space

It’s now possible to use satellite data to measure the threat of climate change to ecological systems that depend on water from fog, according to a newly-published study. The paper, in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, presents the first clear evidence that the relationship between fog levels and vegetation status is measurable using remote...

How climate killed corals

A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. If we’re counting culprits: it’s two by sea, one by land. First, El Niño brought warmer water to the Coral Sea in 2016, threatening Australia’s Great Barrier Reef’s corals. Long-term global warming meant even more heat in the region, according...

New evidence of watery plumes on Jupiter’s moon Europa

Jupiter’s moon Europa is a fascinating world. On its surface, the moon appears to be scratched and scored with reddish-brown scars, which rake across the surface in a crisscrossing pattern. These scars are etched into a layer of water ice, which is thought to be at least several kilometers thick and covering a vast – and potentially habitable – subsurface...

Sounding Saturn’s depths with its seismic icy rings

By Larry O’Hanlon The secrets of Saturn’s veiled interior are leaking out by way of the planet’s spectacular rings, according to a line of research that has taken four decades to come to fruition. In the last few years, what was first considered a sort of wacky hypothesis – that scientists can use Saturn’s rings to learn about  its structure — has...

Going against the trend

Climate and marine scientists are observing pervasive warming of the ocean and the land surfaces across the globe. Since the middle of the 19th century, the average global temperature recorded on the land surface has risen by around one degree centigrade, and by 0.6 degrees across the ocean surface. Global warming has been most pronounced in the alpine...

New Mexico badlands help researchers understand past Martian lava flows (video)

An aerial view of the McCartys flow field in western New Mexico, which is twice the size of Washington, D.C. Cracks in the rock show how the lava shrank as it cooled. Inflation pits can also be seen: pits that formed when the lava flowed and inflated around an obstacle.Credit: Christopher Hamilton. By Lauren Lipuma Planetary scientists are using...

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