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This Newly Discovered Species of Tree Hyrax Goes Bark in the Night

A study makes the case for the new species, based on its looks, genes and sounds Maddie Bender: This is Scientific American 60-Second Science. I’m Maddie Bender. Take a walk in the woods after dark, and you might hear crickets chirping or frogs ribbiting. But there’s a sound you will never hear… [d. Nigricans call] unless you’re traveling...

COVID, Quickly, Episode 9: Delta Variant, Global Vaccine Shortfalls, Beers for Shots

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. Tanya Lewis: Hi, and welcome to COVID, Quickly, a Scientific American...

Animal Kids Listen to Their Parents Even before Birth

Human children: please take note of the behavior of prebirth zebra finches Karen Hopkin: Sounds can convey a lot of information. They can alert animals to potential danger..., [CLIP: Colobus monkeys vocalize] ... let parents know when their offspring are hungry ... [CLIP: Baby lamb bleats] ... or serve as mating calls, territorial warnings or...

For African Elephants, Pee Could Be a Potent Trail Marker

Scientists found that elephants often sniff pathways—and seem especially attuned to urine. Christopher Intagliata: We humans often navigate using road signs and GPS. Elephants, though?  Connie Allen, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Exeter in the U.K., says they navigate over long distances using their incredible memories. (An elephant...

A 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine to Prevent the Next Pandemic

A pan-coronavirus vaccine could be “one vaccine to rule them all,” and so far it has shown strong results in mice, hamsters, monkeys, horses and even sharks. Emily Mullin: This is 60-Second Science. I’m Emily Mullin. In the past 20 years alone, three coronaviruses have caused major disease outbreaks. First came the original SARS virus in 2002. Then,...

A 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine To Prevent the Next Pandemic

A pan-coronavirus vaccine could be 'one vaccine to rule them all' and so far have shown strong results in mice, hamsters, monkeys, horses and even sharks. Emily Mullin: This is 60-Second Science. I’m Emily Mullin. In the past 20 years alone, three coronaviruses have caused major disease outbreaks. First came the original SARS virus in 2002. Then,...

COVID, Quickly, Episode 8: The Pandemic's True Death Toll and the Big Lab-Leak Debate

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. Tanya Lewis: Hi, and welcome to COVID, Quickly, a Scientific American...

Puppies Understand You Even at a Young Age, Most Adorable Study of the Year Confirms

Researchers in the happiest lab in the world tested 375 pups and found they connected with people by eight weeks Karen Hopkin: Dogs and their people. Christopher Hopkin: Who’s a good boy? Are you a good boy? Yes, you are! Karen Hopkin: We like to think our pooches can follow what we’re telling them. Christopher Hopkin: Go get your bally! Over...

New 3-D-Printed Material Is Tough, Flexible--and Alive

Made from microalgae and bacteria, the new substance can survive for three days without feeding, and could one day be used to build living garments, self-powered kitchen appliances, or even window coverings that sequester carbon. Sarah Vitak: This is Scientific American’s 60 Second Science. I’m Sarah Vitak.  What if you could create household objects--...

New 3-D Printed Material Is Tough, Flexible--and Alive

Made from microalgae and bacteria, the new substance can survive for three days without feeding, and could one day be used to build living garments, self-powered kitchen appliances, or even window coverings that sequester carbon. Sarah Vitak: This is Scientific American’s 60 Second Science. I’m Sarah Vitak.  What if you could create household objects--...

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