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The 60-Second Podcast Takes a Short Break--But Wait, There's More

Scientific American's short-form podcast has been going for 16 years, 3 months, and 7 days, counting today, but it's time for us to evolve. Jeffery DelViscio: Hello 60-Second Science fans, this is Jeff DelViscio, the executive producer of the podcast. First, I really just want to thank you all for being loyal listeners–for however long you've been...

The 60-Second Podcast Takes a Short Break--but Wait, There's More

Scientific American's short-form podcast has been going for 16 years, 3 months, and 7 days, counting today, but it's time for us to evolve. Jeffery DelViscio: Hello 60-Second Science fans, this is Jeff DelViscio, the executive producer of the podcast. First, I really just want to thank you all for being loyal listeners–for however long you've been...

Is Your Phone Actually Draining Your Brain?

A new study puts the “brain drain hypothesis”—the idea that just having a phone next to you impacts your cognition—to the test to see if the science passes muster. Shayla Love: This is Scientific American’s 60-Second Science. I’m Shayla Love. Tell me if this sounds familiar. You’re trying to get some work done, and you find yourself continually...

Why Your Dog Might Think You're a Bonehead

The verdict is in: female dogs actively evaluate human competence. Karen Hopkin: This is Scientific American’s 60-Second Science. I’m Karen Hopkin. Ever get the feeling that your cat is judging you?  [Cat meows] Hopkin: Well, you’re in for a surprise. Because it’s actually your pooch who might be viewing you with a critical eye.  [Dog barking...

How Vaccines Saved Money and Lives and China's Zero-COVID Protests: COVID, Quickly Podcast, Episode 44

Vaccines saved New York City billions of dollars, and China faces public fury over its strict virus-control policies. Tanya Lewis: Hi, and welcome to COVID, Quickly, a Scientific American podcast series! Josh Fischman: This is your fast-track update on the COVID pandemic. We bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about...

Alaska's Protective Sea Ice Wall Is Crumbling because of the Climate Crisis

A massive storm slammed into Alaska’s western coast, and there was no ice to stop it. This is Scientific American’s 60 Second Science. I’m Emily Schwing.  Emily Schwing: In September, a massive storm on Alaska’s western coast brought a surge of water 17 miles inland from the Bering Sea to the Cup’ik village of Chevak. [Sounds of kids playing]...

It's the Bass That Makes Us Boogie

Concert goers danced more when music was supplemented with low-frequency bass tones. Karen Hopkin: This is Scientific American’s 60-Second Science. I’m Karen Hopkin. Hopkin: Ever notice that some music just really makes you want to dance? Well, a new study shows that it is, indeed, all about the bass. Because researchers have found that, during...

How Vaccines Saved Money and Lives, and China's Zero-COVID Protests: COVID, Quickly Podcast, Episode 44

Vaccines saved New York City billions of dollars, and China faces public fury over its strict virus-control policies. Tanya Lewis: Hi, and welcome to COVID, Quickly, a Scientific American podcast series! Josh Fischman: This is your fast-track update on the COVID pandemic. We bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about...

'Chatty Turtles' Flip the Script on the Evolutionary Origins of Vocalization in Animals

Recordings of more than 50 species of turtles and other animals help scientists reassess the origins of acoustic communication in vertebrates. Pakinam Amer: This is Scientific American’s 60-Second Science. I’m Pakinam Amer. Clicks, clucks, grunts, and snorts—these are not sounds that we typically associate with turtles. [CLIP: Audio of South American...

Tardigrades, an Unlikely Sleeping Beauty

Researchers put this ancient critter through a subzero gauntlet to learn more about what happens to their internal clock while surviving the extreme. Ashleigh Papp: This is Scientific American’s 60-Second Science. I’m Ashleigh Papp. Papp: Imagine a little critter that isn’t quite an insect or an animal. It’s about one millimeter in length, shaped...

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