WebUrbanist

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The 99% Invisible City: Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design

[ By WebUrbanist in Travel & Urban Exploration. ] From the creators of WebUrbanist and 99% Invisible comes a new beautifully designed and illustrated guide to cities. In their New York Times best-selling book, The 99% Invisible City: A Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design, Kurt Kohlstedt and Roman Mars zoom in to tell fascinating...

Urbanist Exploration: Discover Over 5,000 Compelling Architecture, Art & Design Stories

[ By WebUrbanist in 7 Wonders Series & Travel. ] For over a decade, WebUrbanist has featured a wide range of innovative and inspiring urban art and design projects from around the world. The website has attracted more than 500,000 subscribers and been visited over 100,000,000 times since it was launched in 2007. And while WU will remain...

Wondering About: Deserted Cities, Derelict Buildings & the Allure of Abandoned Places

[ By WebUrbanist in Abandoned Places & Architecture. ] Before it was abandoned in the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, Pripyat was a thriving Ukrainian city with a population of nearly 50,000. The relatively sudden exodus of its inhabitants left behind a physical snapshot of the times, preserved by the absence of humans intervention...

Clean Vandals: Invisible Paint & Reverse Graffiti Artists Work in Gray Areas

[ By WebUrbanist in Art & Street Art & Graffiti. ] The word “graffiti” usually conjures images of people with spray cans illegally making murals or jotting down tags using colorful paints. A lot artistic interventions use other tools and materials, though, subverting expectations and working in (literal and legal) gray areas to create...

Redressed to Impress: Uncovering Camouflaged Facades & Architectural Fake Overs

[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Public & Institutional. ] The world is full of architectural fake overs, from individual facades to entire buildings designed to look like something other than what they really are. Historically, some of these disguises have been less well-intentioned than others. During World War II, Nazis gave the...

Saving Up Space: Transforming, Multifunctional & Flat-Pack Furniture Designs & Ideas

[ By WebUrbanist in Design & Furniture & Decor. ] In 1900, San Francisco entrepreneur William Murphy designed a fold-out bed that would allow him to court a young opera singer inside his studio apartment. The hidden bed was a workaround to circumvent dated taboos against having ladies enter a gentleman’s bedroom. With no visible bed,...

Shipping Manifesto: An Introductory Guide to Building Cargo Container Architecture

[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Houses & Residential. ] In the 1950s, Malcolm McLean developed a modular design that would simplify the loading and offloading of ships, boxing up goods for easier loading and unloading between trains, trucks and boats The standardization of cargo containers revolutionized the modern shipping industry....

Outward Mobility: Clever Campers, Trailers & DIY Mobile Home Conversions

[ By WebUrbanist in Technology & Vehicles & Mods. ] The 20th-century American dream of suburban houses and picket fences unfolded in parallel with another vision: freedom to roam, embodied in camper vans and other mobile housing designs. The increasing costs of city living and desire to escape nine-to-five life has since led to a new...

Localvore Revolution: Vertical Urban Farms Promise to Deliver Greener Produce

[ By WebUrbanist in Conceptual & Futuristic & Technology. ] In Newark, New Jersey, a large and deceptively nondescript building is redefining the Garden State, producing millions of pounds of food per year just outside of Manhattan. This 70,000 square foot facility has the equivalent yield of over 5 million square feet of traditional...

Living City Streets: The Global Drive to Reclaim Routes for Cyclists & Pedestrians

[ By WebUrbanist in Culture & History & Travel. ] In the mid-1900s, Dutch citizens of Delft were sick of cars driving too fast down their narrow residential streets. The city was slow to respond, so residents took matters into their own hands. Groups of neighbors came together and tore up sections of pavement, then put up planters and...

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