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What the rise of digital nomads can tell us about the next wave of remote working

If one thing is clear about remote work, it's this: Many people prefer it and don't want their bosses to take it away. When the pandemic forced office employees into lockdown and cut them off from spending in-person time with their colleagues, they almost immediately realized that they favor remote work over their traditional office routines and norms....

CRISPR: Can we control it?

CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is a revolutionary technology that gives scientists the ability to alter DNA. On the one hand, this tool could mean the elimination of certain diseases. On the other, there are concerns (both ethical and practical) about its misuse and the yet-unknown consequences of such experimentation."The...

Smartly dressed: Researchers develop clothes that sense movement via touch

In recent years there have been exciting breakthroughs in wearable technologies, like smartwatches that can monitor your breathing and blood oxygen levels. But what about a wearable that can detect how you move as you do a physical activity or play a sport, and could potentially even offer feedback on how to improve your technique? And, as a major bonus,...

Do you worry too much? Stoicism can help

Stoicism is the philosophy that nothing about the world is good or bad in itself, and that we have control over both our judgments and our reactions to things. It is hardest to control our reactions to the things that come unexpectedly. By meditating every day on the "worst case scenario," we can take the sting out of the worst that life can throw our...

160-million-year-old ‘Monkeydactyl’ was the first animal to develop opposable thumbs

The 'Monkeydactly', or Kunpengopterus antipollicatus, was a species of pterosaur, a group of flying reptiles that were the first vertebrates to evolve the ability of powered flight.In a recent study, a team of researchers used microcomputed tomography scanning to analyze the anatomy of the newly discovered species, finding that it was the first known...

Study: People will donate more to charity if they think something’s in it for them

A study finds asking for donations by appealing to the donor's self-interest may result in more money than appealing to their better nature. Those who received an appeal to self-interest were both more likely to give and gave more than those in the control group. The effect was most pronounced for those who hadn't given before.Even the best charities...

Is it good for you? According to Nietzsche, it's better to ask, "Does it dance?"

Friedrich Nietzsche's body of work is notoriously difficult to navigate. He wrote in multiple styles, including essays, aphorisms, poems, and fiction. He introduced idiosyncratic concepts such as the free spirit, the Übermensch, eternal recurrence, ressentiment, the ascetic ideal, the revaluation of values, and the affirmation of life. He shifted allegiances:...

When great video games make great art

Most video games are happily escapist entertainment, but some are much more. One of these is The Last of Us Part II (TLOU2), which takes place in a post-apocalyptic pandemic world. Through the innovative use of game play technology TLOU2, radically changes your perspective and elevates this game from entertainment to true art.There are basically two...

Brain-controlled chess is here

A brain-controlled interface implements a two-step process: Identify the chess piece, then place it on the board.The program was 96 percent accurate at correctly moving chess pieces.This research opens up opportunities for physically impaired people to express themselves in new ways.By November 2020, The Queen's Gambit had been watched in over 62 million...

Why Aristotle didn't invent modern science

Modern science requires scrutinizing the tiniest of details and an almost irrational dedication to empirical observation. Many scientists believe that theories should be "beautiful," but such argumentation is forbidden in modern science. Neglecting beauty would be a step too far for Aristotle.Modern science has done astounding things: sending probes...

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