Longform

The best non-fiction, past and present.

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The Real Cost of Amazon

“It’s like I’m risking my life for a dollar.” Shirin Ghaffary | Recode | Jun 2020 [Full Story]

How Police Secretly Took Over a Global Phone Network for Organized Crime

Police monitored a hundred million encrypted messages sent through Encrochat, a network used by career criminals to discuss drug deals, murders, and extortion plots. Joseph Cox | Motherboard | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

Family Secrets

Why did two wealthy Sri Lankan brothers become suicide bombers? Samanth Subramanian | The New York Times Magazine | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

Michaela the Destroyer

How a young talent from East London went from open-mic nights to making the most sublimely unsettling show of the year. E. Alex Jung | New York | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

Who Died for Your Dinner?

How a July 4th meal exposes the coronavirus risk for thousands of US food workers. Katie J.M. Baker | Buzzfeeed | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

The Double Life of Peter Arno

On the pioneering New Yorker cartoonist. Ben Schwartz | Vanity Fair | Apr 2016 [Full Story]

Trump, Twitter, Facebook, and the Future of Online Speech

The debate over censorship and Section 230 is thorny, contentious, and, above all, outdated. Anna Wiener | New Yorker | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

The Cursed Platoon

Clint Lorance had been in charge of his platoon for only three days when he ordered his men to kill three Afghans stopped on a dirt road. A second-degree murder conviction and pardon followed. Today, Lorance is hailed as a hero by President Trump. His troops have suffered a very different fate. Greg Jaffe | Washington Post | Jun 2020 [Full...

This Profile of Charlie Kaufman Has Changed

How do you write about Hollywood’s most self-referential screenwriter at a destabilizing moment in history? It takes more than one draft. Jon Mooallem | New York Times Magazine | Jul 2020 [Full Story]

Objections Overruled: Thousands of U.S. judges who broke laws or oaths remained on the bench

In the past dozen years, state and local judges have repeatedly escaped public accountability for misdeeds that have victimized thousands. Nine of 10 kept their jobs, a Reuters investigation found – including an Alabama judge who unlawfully jailed hundreds of poor people, many of them Black, over traffic fines. Michael Berens | Reuters | Jun 2020...

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