Scientific American Podcast: 60-Second Science

Science news and technology updates from Scientific American

Latest articles

Why Some Birds Are Likely To Hit Buildings

Those that eat insects, migrate or usually live in the woods are most likely to fly into buildings that feature a lot of glass. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Sparrow Song Undergoes Key Change

White-throated sparrows made a change to their familiar call that quickly spread across Canada. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Polynesians and Native South Americans Made 12th-Century Contact

Scientists have found snippets of Native South American DNA in the genomes of present-day Polynesians, and they trace the contact to the year 1150. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Animals Appreciate Recent Traffic Lull

Researchers saw a third fewer vehicle collisions with deer, elk, moose and other large mammals in the four weeks following COVID-19 shutdowns in three states they tracked. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Bat Says Hi as It Hunts

Velvety free-tailed bats produce sounds that help them locate insect prey but simultaneously identify them to their companions. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Forests Getting Younger and Shorter

Old, big trees are dying faster than in the past, leaving younger, less biodiverse forests that store less carbon worldwide. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Young Great White Sharks Eat off the Floor

The stomach contents of young great white sharks show that they spend a lot of time patrolling the seafloor for meals. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Tweets Reveal Politics of COVID-19 

Political scientists analyzed congressional tweets and observed how Republicans and Democrats responded differently to the virus. Christopher Intagliata reports.  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Nature's Goods and Services Get Priced

The gross ecosystem product, or GEP, tries to take into account the contribution of nature to the economy. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

Many species are known to have changed their migration routes in response to the changing climate. They now include mule deer and Bewick’s swans. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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