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Ten Days in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

After spending a day in Juneau gearing up, we flew over to Gustavus, Alaska and then got a ride to Bartlett Cove in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. We then rented kayaks and headed into Glacier Bay. Shortly after being dropped off by the Day Boat at Mount Wright, the team (left to right, Jacob Hassan, Nick Wiesenberg, Jack Whitehouse and...

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Lingulid brachiopod trace fossils from the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation of southwestern Utah

This is a short trace fossil story with two disappointments, one much more than the other. It involves trace fossils made by lingulid brachiopods, a marine invertebrate group with a very long geological history. The earliest appeared in the Cambrian, and, as you can see from the top image, they are very much alive today. (Image of Lingula anatina from...

Alaska Day 5 – Juneau

There are two legs to the project this summer. Lilly and Fred are headed back to the Wooster Tree Ring Lab with samples from Kake and Jacob and Jack have arrived. Jack, Jacob, Nick and I will now travel to Glacier Bay for 10 days of sampling ancient forests. As a warmup, the group hiked to Mendenhall Glacier. The glacier is rapidly retreating but we...

Alaska Day 4

A view from the porch of the Forest Service cabin out into the Sound. Day 4 started in the intertidal zone at low tide. Identification of the various intertebrates included the limpet above. This large cockle was squirting water through its syphon and was easily captured. Sea stars are abundant – this one was named Patrick. This sea anemnome...

Alaska Day 3

Coring the furthest north stand of Western Redcedar (Thuja plicata). Celebrating another successful core extraction by Siah. Banana slug on the forest floor. Mounting the redcedar cores at the Forest Service cabin. Also examining cores taken in previous years. Long Beach at Macartney Point. An afternoon of tossing the frisbee and trash cleanup....

Alaska_2022

We arrived in Juneau on Sunday flying from Cleveland to Juneau. The goal of the trip is to work with the AYLS youth group of Kake Alaska (formerly known as TRAYLS) coring trees with both the Wooster group of faculty, staff and students and AYLS learning more about the forests of Southeast, Alaska. Lilly took a great picture of the dock on Auke Lake...

Reflecting on the Earth Sciences Department’s Community Climate Change (CCC) Project

Editor’s note: The following is by Caitlyn Denes (’23). “The Community Climate Change Project sought to document the changes in climate in Wooster, Ohio and surrounding communities. Through the collection, analysis, and interpretation of climatological data, we summarized our findings and developed recommendations to improve the resiliency of the community...

New paper: Early Neoproterozoic stromatolites from south Liaoning Province, China

I’m pleased to announce the online publication of a new paper from a Chinese-American geological team (Zhang et al., 2022). I’m the sole American! My role was minor, being mostly useful for literature review and writing. The senior author is my friend Yong-Li Zhang from Northeastern University, Shenyang. He was my host on my adventurous (and painful)...

The Diatom Lake Adventure: Ice ages, hotel titrations, and the Midwest

Editor’s note: Rising Wooster senior Richard Torres (’23) had a spectacular opportunity this summer (May 31 – June 12, 2022) to participate in a National Science Foundation-funded research trip with Dr. Tom Lowell (on the right) and his team from the University of Cincinnati. Below is Richard’s account. Unless otherwise noted, all the images are from...

Old dogs, old tricks: A very pleasant day of paleontology in the Lower Carboniferous of northeastern Ohio

The weather was perfect today in verdant northeastern Ohio. Bill Ausich (retired paleontologist from The Ohio State University), Nigel Brush (retired geologist/archaeologist from Ashland University), and I (not retired!) have started a project examining the crinoids and associated fossils of the Wooster Shale (Lower Carboniferous) in northeastern Ohio....

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