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What I learned at Wikimania

As you may know, I like going to conferences outside the usual subsurface circuit. For this year's amusement, I spent part of last week at the annual Wikimania conference, which this year was in London, UK. I've been to Wikimania before, but this year the conference promised to be bigger and/or better than ever. And I was looking for an excuse to visit...

The Blangy equation

After reading Chris Liner's recent writings on attenuation and negative Q — both in The Leading Edge and on his blog — I've been reading up a bit on anisotropy. The idea was to stumble a little closer to writing the long-awaited Q is for Q post in our A to Z series. As usual, I got distracted... In his 1994 paper AVO in tranversely isotropic media—An...

July linkfest

It's linkfest time again. All the links, in one handy post. First up — I've seen some remarkable scientific visualizations recently. For example, giant ocean vortices spiralling across the globe (shame about the rainbow colourbar though). Or the trillion-particle Dark Sky Simulation images we saw at SciPy. Or this wonderful (real, not simulated) video...

Graphics that repay careful study

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte (2nd ed., Graphics Press, 2001) celebrates communication through data graphics. The book provides a vocabulary and practical theory for data graphics, and Tufte pulls no punches — he suggests why some graphics are better than others, and even condemns failed ones as lost opportunities. The...

Whither technical books?

Leafing through our pile of new books on seismic analysis got me thinking about technical books and the future of technical publishing. In particular: Why are these books so expensive?  When will we start to see reproducibility? Does all this stuff just belong on the web? Why so expensive? Should technical books really cost several times what ordinary...

Six books about seismic analysis

Last year, I did a round-up of six books about seismic interpretation. A raft of new geophysics books recently, mostly from Cambridge, prompts this look at six volumes on seismic analysis — the more quantitative side of interpretation. We seem to be a bit hopeless at full-blown book reviews, and I certainly haven't read all of these books from cover...

The event that connects like the web

Last week, Matt, Ben, and I attended SciPy 2014, the 13th annual scientific computing with Python conference. On a superficial level, it was just another conference. But there were other elements, brought forth by the organizers and participants (definitely not just attendees) and slowly revealed over the week. Together, the community created the conditions...

Geophysics at SciPy 2014

Wednesday was geophysics day at SciPy 2014, the conference for scientific Python in Austin. We had a mini-symposium in the afternoon, with 4 talks and 2 lightning talks about posters. All the talks Here's what went on in the session... Matt Hall — Modelr seismic models Patrick Cole — PyGMI grav-mag modeling Joe Kington, Chevron — 3D seismic viz in Python Leo...

SciPy will eat the world... in a good way

We're at the SciPy 2014 conference in Austin, the big giant meetup for everyone into scientific Python. One surprising thing so far is the breadth of science and computing in play, from astronomy to zoology, and from AI to zero-based indexing. It shouldn't have been surprising, as SciPy.org hints at the variety: There's really nothing you can't do in...

Looking forward to SciPy 2014

This week the Agile crew is at the SciPy conference in Austin, Texas. SciPy is a scientific library for the Python programming language, and the eponymous conference is the annual meetup for the physicists, astonomers, economists — and even the geophysicists! — that develop and use SciPy. What is SciPy? Python is an awesome high-level programming language....

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