Education

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Civics Secures Democracy Act Proposes Grants To Support Civics Education

NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware about a bipartisan initiative to invest $1 billion in civics and history education.

Educating For Democracy Act Proposes Grants To Support Civics Education

NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware about a bipartisan initiative to invest $1 billion in civics and history education.

COMIC: For Music Teacher, Virtual School Meant Teaching Kids 'To Hear The Way I Hear'

It's been a year since teachers were handed an unprecedented request: educate students in entirely new ways amid the backdrop of a pandemic. (Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR)

A Small Wyoming Town Has Attracted Families Looking For In-Person Special Education

The number of special education students in tiny Powell, Wyo., went from 10 to 52 in one school year. Most moved there because it prioritized in-person classes.

A Picture Book About Children At The Border Aims To Spark Family Conversations

The new children's book Hear My Voice/Escucha Mi Voz pulls from the author's interviews with migrant children detained in U.S. facilities in 2019.(Image credit: Adriana Campos/Workman Publishing)

Should Colleges Require COVID-19 Vaccines For Fall? More Campuses Are Saying Yes

More campuses are expected to add the requirement, with potential legal challenges ahead. One key point: Requiring vaccines for infectious diseases is nothing new for many residential colleges.(Image credit: Susan Haejin Lee for NPR)

Stanford's 'Marriage Pact' Is Actually A Great Way To Understand Economic Markets

At Stanford University, an assignment for a class on markets led to an experiment using economic thinking to match undergrads together romantically. It's a great way to understand many other markets.

State Rep. Jeremy Gray's Bill To Bring Yoga Back To Alabama Public Schools

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Alabama State Rep. Jeremy Gray about his bill to bring yoga back to the state's public schools.

Why So Many Asian Americans Are Learning Remotely

Multigenerational households and anti-Asian bullying may play a role. (Image credit: Tracy J. Lee for NPR)

Asian Americans Most Likely To Be Learning Remotely

Federal data suggests Asian Americans as the most likely to be learning remotely this year. Experts and community members say the reasons range from differing views of the pandemic to racist bullying.

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