National Geographic Photo of the Day

National Geographic Photo of the Day

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Musical Traditions

In Dimen, a small village in Guizhou Province, China, children learn traditional songs from elders. The Dong people have no written version of their language, Kam, so it is passed down orally, often through song.

Winter Nap

A polar bear and her cub sleep in the snow. The bears are waiting for the Hudson Bay to freeze over so that they can spend the winter hunting seals on the ice.

Ancient History

At the Castle of Simancas, Spain, a scholar works with ancient texts. The castle holds more than 30 million documents, dating from the 12th through the 19th centuries.

Berber Brides

A Berber groom kisses his bride at a mass wedding in Taarart, Morocco. Berbers living in rural areas of Morocco carry on cultural traditions that have lasted at least 5,000 years.

Mighty Goat

A mountain goat perches on a wall of the Stikine River Grand Canyon in British Columbia, Canada. Mountain goats' unique hooves allow them to travel where their predators—wolves, bears, and cougars—cannot.

Sandstorm Prayers

Uygur pilgrims pray at the graves of Islamic saints during the Imam Asim festival near Hotan, Xinjiang Province, China. The Uygur people are a Muslim minority in China, heavily persecuted by the Chinese government.

Tents on Ice

Double-layered tents shelter researchers from wind in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. As part of an expedition in the mid-1980s, scientists dove in the sound, with water temperatures around 28 degrees Fahrenheit.

Ancient Languages

There are fewer than a thousand Seri people in Mexico, meaning their native language is fading fast. Isabel Chavela Torres is blind and almost completely deaf, but she still passes on as much traditional knowledge as she can.

Winter Sun

At the Lower Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, dead trees create makeshift sun dials. On the horizon, steam from thermal pools is visible.

Burma Road

Naga tribeswomen walk along what's left of the Burma Road in Myanmar. Tens of thousands of U.S. troops and Asian workers carved the route through unforgiving jungles to serve as an Allied supply line between China and Burma during World War II—and hundreds of them lost their lives to disease, accidents, and Japanese attacks.

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