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Democratic Values Are Still Under Attack — Even Without Trump In The White House

During the Trump presidency, many worried about the administration’s violation of long-standing norms. And former President Trump certainly did break with a number of enduring traditions, to the extent that his utter disregard for his office almost ceased to shock. But here at FiveThirtyEight, we have argued that Trump’s flouting of norms...

Latino Voters Aren’t A Monolith, But The GOP Made Gains With Them Just About Everywhere In 2020

In this installment of the FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast, Galen Druke speaks with Stephanie Valencia and Carlos Odio, founders of the political research firm Equis Research. Their recent data-driven post-mortem of the Latino vote in 2020 looks at which voters were most likely to support former President Trump and offers some hypotheses as to why.

Why Americans Can’t Resist A Celebrity Political Candidate

Welcome to Pollapalooza, our weekly polling roundup. Are Americans in favor of the celebrity politician post-Trump? Seems like it, according to recent polling. The consumer research platform Piplsay found earlier this week that 58 percent of respondents said they would like to see one or both of the actors Matthew McConaughey and Dwayne...

Politics Podcast: Will Trump’s Gains With Latino Voters Last?

By Galen Druke   More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS When Donald Trump came onto the scene in 2015, some analysts assumed his anti-immigrant rhetoric would be poison for Latino voters. But in 2016, Trump did...

Many Democrats Are Sick Of Iowa And New Hampshire Going First, But The Primary Calendar Is Unlikely To Change

Like death and taxes, it’s long been a fact of life that Iowa and New Hampshire kick off both the Republican and Democratic presidential primaries.  However, the nightmarish hellscape that was the Iowa caucuses in the 2020 Democratic primary — the Iowa Democratic Party released barely any results the night of the caucuses because of technical...

Can A Local Reparations Program Undo Decades Of Housing Discrimination?

Talking about reparations was once politically taboo. The idea was not only widely unpopular, but the term was understood differently depending on who was asked. Even the most progressive stalwarts on race issues — those who said they were in favor of reparations for Black people as restitution for slavery and government-sanctioned discrimination —...

Why We Are (And Should Be) Talking About Voting Rights Right Now

Welcome to FiveThirtyEight’s politics chat. The transcript below has been lightly edited. sarah (Sarah Frostenson, politics editor): Georgia’s new voting law has captured headlines for all the ways in which it makes voting harder. It’s also not the only state considering these kinds of laws; there are nearly 20 states in which voting...

HBO’s QAnon Doc Falls Into Traps Around The Rabbit Hole

One of the many weird things about reporting on QAnon is that you inevitably start thinking like a conspiracy theorist yourself. Covering a cult as bizarre and perverse as QAnon — its followers believe there is a global cabal of Satan-worshipping child sex traffickers that an anonymous government insider known as “Q” is working to expose — requires...

All The Elections To Watch In 2021

The wheels of democracy never stop turning — even in odd years. Between the presidential race of 2020 and the midterm elections of 2022, hundreds of elections will be held in 2021 in states and cities whose election calendars don’t sync up with most of the rest of the country. There will also be at least four special elections for the U.S. House that...

Why The Republican Party Isn’t Rebranding After 2020

Typically, after losing a presidential election, a political party will undertake an intense intra-party debate over why it didn’t win and how the party needs to change to take back the White House. Democrats did so after losing in 1988, 2000, 2004 and 2016. In fact, even after winning in 2020 — taking control of the White House and U.S. Senate and...

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